Carpe Diem
&
Portland State University


Why not earn college credit on top of this life changing experience? Through Carpe Diem’s partnership with Portland State University, students are eligible to complete up to 18 quarter credits during their program (up to 36 quarter credits during the Latitudes Year). Carpe Diem is one of very few programs in the country that offers an option to earn college credit while abroad during a Gap Year, giving you a jump start when you attend the college of your choice. Earning college credit while on program will also make you eligible for financial aid (should you qualify).

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How it all works


We want our students present while on program, so the majority of course hours are built into programs. This includes volunteer projects, cultural immersion, and language study hours. Additionally, courses may ask you to interview locals, read relevant books for your program’s region, create an art project, and/or give a short presentation to your student group. Each assignment is designed to better integrate the experience while in-country. You will be required to keep a daily journal, and at the conclusion of each semester, write a 5-10 page paper for each course you choose to complete (refer to each syllabus for full completion requirements).

Important Dates
Fall Semester:

September 15th: Registration Deadline
October 5th: last day students may drop their courses without a record at PSU. (Full Drop)
January 5th: last day students may drop their courses, resulting in a ‘W’ grade. (Withdrawal)
January 20th: Course work is due
Please Note: If no course work is submitted and you have not dropped your courses prior to the above deadlines, you will receive a no pass for your courses. (No Pass)

Spring Semester:

February 15th: Registration Deadline
March 5th: last day students may drop their courses without a record at PSU. (Full Drop)
June 5th: last day students may drop their courses, resulting in a ‘W’ grade. (Withdrawal)
June 20th: Course work is due
Please Note: If no course work is submitted and you have not dropped your courses prior to the above deadlines, you will receive a no pass for your courses. (No Pass)

Selecting Courses
All courses are offered each semester. Language courses are only offered on programs that they’re applicable to i.e. Spanish Language is offered for our South and Central America students. When selecting courses we find that students are most successful when they choose the ones they’re most interested in. Read through each syllabus to understand all requirements and note any prerequisites.

You can find the full syllabi by logging into your Carpe Diem Student Account.

Registration
When you have selected your courses, please submit the Course Registration Form and your Registration Fee. Upon receipt, Carpe Diem will complete the registration process with PSU on your behalf.

*Latitudes Students only need submit the Course Registration Form.

PLEASE NOTE: do not apply to PSU unless you’ll be using Financial Aid. See our Financial Aid Page for more details.

Fees
The course registration fee is $1,300, payable to Carpe Diem. Whether you choose to complete 1 or multiple courses, the fee is the same.

PLEASE NOTE: If you are a Latitudes Student you do not need to submit the registration fee as it is included in your tuition.

Submit Course Work
All course work will be submitted directly to the course instructor. Please refer to the syllabi for further instructions.

Fall Semester:

January 20th: Course work is due

Spring Semester:

June 20th: Course work is due

Grades
You will receive your unofficial grade report via email after all course work has been submitted. Upon receipt, you will have 2 weeks to approve or contest your grades before they’re sent to PSU for final processing.

Transcript Request
After you have approved of your final grades, they will be sent to PSU for processing. It can take 4-6 weeks (sometimes less) for your grades to be entered by the Registrar.

Please check with our contact, Karin Waller, in the Office of International Affairs prior to requesting a transcript. Karin can be reached at 503-725-5076 or wallerk@pdx.edu.

Follow this link to request your official PSU Transcript.

PLEASE NOTE: you will need your PSU Student ID Number in order to request your transcript. If you do not know your PSU Student ID number, please contact Carpe Diem Education’s office.

Questions?
Prospective Students: Please contact our office and we’d be happy to answer any questions you may have about earning college credit.

Current Students: If have questions about course requirements, need topic approval, or would like to request an extension, please contact the course instructor directly. Contact information can be found on each syllabus within your MyAccount page.

Transferring Credit

Carpe Diem students have seen great success when transferring credits received through Portland State University on to other colleges/universities. When transferring in credits many colleges/universities typically consider them as general elective or entry level credit. However, because every college/university has different guidelines for evaluating transfer credits, Carpe Diem Education can not guarantee their transferability. We encourage students to talk with the International Programs/Study Abroad Office and/or the Admissions Office at their college/university to understand how transfer credits are evaluated.

Course Offerings


Carpe Diem students have access to download all syllabi within their Carpe Diem student account. If you’re not a Carpe Diem student yet and need access to a syllabus, please call our office.

*** All 399 level courses and Spanish 299 have prerequisites that must be fulfilled prior to enrolling. ***

Anthropology
ANTH (103): Introduction to Social/Cultural Anthropology (4 credits)

In this introduction to socio-cultural anthropology, students will gain exposure to valuable information from peoples and cultures around the world, learning about different forms of communication, religious and symbolic systems, technological adaptations to environment, and power dynamics in social systems. Students will be introduced to anthropological theory by reading an ethnography and conducting their own fieldwork.

ANTH (399): Societies and Cultures; Reinforcing “The Other” (4 credits)

In this upper-division course students will apply knowledge theyʼve learned from previous Anthropology courses to better understand the ways the host-country’s State policies and politics increase the social divides. Such cultural divides could be relative to socio-economic differences, differences in geographic residency within the host-country, or even the ways that a national identity is disparate in some areas but wholly aligned in others. Supplemental assignments offer opportunities for research and reflection of experiences.

Art
ART (199): Art Through Cultural Exchange (4 credits)

The course is an introduction to multiple art forms, including musical, visual, dance, meditation, yoga and/or movement. The course will encourage students to critically examine art and their artistic views within the context of the culture in which they travel, and to evaluate ways in which they relate to their travel group with an emphasis on art, artistic influences, and the impact art has on the host-culture. Supplemental assignments will offer opportunities for research and reflection of experiences.

ART (399): International Art Intensive (4 credits)

The course is a more intensive study about a particular art form that may include art, painting, stone carving, textiles, music, visual, dance, meditation, yoga and/or movement. It provides for both personal and professional growth and is intended for students who want to expand beyond the traditional classroom learning setting. This course will ask students to create an artistic representation of their overseas experience and write a paper in summary of it.

Community Health
PHE (250): Our Community: Our Health (4 credits)

This course will engage students in responsible and challenging volunteer activity while helping them gain an understanding and knowledge of the health care system of their host country. Students will be exposed to alternative healthcare systems and alternative healthcare practices. They will learn about the pros and cons of the host-countryʼs healthcare and health, and chart progressive ways to improve. Possible subjects could include, obesity, infant-mortality, domestic-violence, addiction issues, HIV/AIDS transmission and prevention, nutrition, water sanitation, etc.

Economics
ECON (201): Principles of Economics; International Economics (4 credits)

Students will enhance their understanding of global economics and the ways that decisions on the macro scale have an impact on a micro level (local population). Students will gain a first-hand experience of the ways that international policy impacts local populations and seek an understanding for how the global supply chain works. They will be asked to trace a particular commodity from production to purchase, with each step along the way understanding where the dollars have passed and what are the results from each step.

ECON (399): Economics and the Impact of “Fair-Trade” Versus “Free-Trade” (6 credits)

Students will enhance their understanding of global economics and the ways that decisions on the macro scale have an impact on a local population. Students will gain a first-hand experience of the ways that international policy impacts local populations and seek an understanding for how the global supply chain works.

Environmental Science & Management
ESM (199): Environmental Sustainability (6 credits)

This course is designed to provide hands-on learning opportunities for undergraduate students who undertake foreign travel. It offers the student an opportunity to learn outside of the classroom and affords an opportunity to take advantage of appropriate technology, sustainability issues in the developing world, and to learn first hand about local issues of environmental entropy which are available through travel.

ESM (399): Global Warming and The People (6 credits)

This course is designed to provide hands-on learning opportunities for undergraduate students who undertake foreign travel. It offers the student an opportunity to experience outside of the classroom some of the tell-tale signs of a shift in local and regional weather patterns. Students will be asked to understand the basic science, explore opposing viewpoints, and to relate them to things theyʼve witnessed or experienced while on their semester.

Geography
GEOG (199): Geography of Globalization in Food (4 credits)

This course is designed to provide hands-on learning opportunities for undergraduate students who undertake foreign travel. It offers the student the opportunity to explore different food systems, the methods in which food is produced and grown in that culture, and to seek an understanding of how that culture uses organic, alternative, and/or progressive methods of farming. Students may also explore the ways in which that culture eats and perceives their food, their level of interaction with fast food chains, local farming, and that culture’s general nutrition.

GEOG (399): Environment and Its Peoples (4 credits)

This course is designed to provide hands-on learning opportunities for undergraduate students who undertake foreign travel. Students will undertake a deep understanding of the ways that the environment impacts and influences the people who live in it. Students are encouraged to think about non-traditional interpretations of the environment. Some examples might include high mountain ranges, social isolation, closeness to wildlife, city-dwelling, proximity to clean drinking water, proximity to transportation, elevation, etc.

History
HIST (199): Colonialization and Western Interference (4 credits)

In this study of colonialism and the history of Western influences, students will undertake to understand the influences that colonialism has had on the host-country. Students will explore the ways local cultures have been impacted by the influences of “westernized countries” that might include infrastructure (roads, trains, and transportation), language, gender roles, world-view, social justice issues, sanitation, food, politics, political influences, natural resource management, etc. It provides for both personal and professional growth and is intended for students who desire to expand their educational experiences beyond the traditional classroom setting by working directly within another culture.

International Studies
INTL (199): Globalization Awareness and Community Development (6 credits)

This course provides students with an opportunity to learn through work experience and volunteer service concurrent with assignments while on their academic study abroad program. It engages students in meaningful work/volunteer experiences while helping them gain an understanding of a particular issue of their choosing relevant to globalization and its impacts on local populations. Themes can include the ways the local communities are impacted by the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund, international development as practiced by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) program, global wealth distribution, alternative government systems and their advantages/disadvantages, and more.

INTL (399): Evaluations of International Non-Governmental Organizations (6 credits)

This course is designed as an advanced course, where students are asked to take on a detailed exploration of International Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) and chart both their benefits to the local populations to which they serve, as well as the ways they often times donʼt work. Students will be asked to understand what some of the common pitfalls are in INGOs and as well as whether in the long-term they are creating more problems than theyʼre fixing.

INTL (299): Context and Culture: Defining Systems (6 credits for Latitudes Students ONLY)

This international experiential course creates an opportunity for students to assess and analyze systems and subsystems contained within an area of interest to the students such as business (for example, accounting, fiscal accountability, etc.), social work (for example, child development, health, etc.) the environment, organizational development, gender, education and politics. Students will be expected to integrate information from participant observation, research, readings and interviews to inform conclusions. A plan to approach the course will be approved by the instructor within 10 days of beginning the work/volunteer experience.

Music
MUS (199): Applied World Music (3 credits)

This course is designed to provide hands-on learning opportunities for undergraduate students who undertake foreign travel. It offers the student an opportunity to learn about local music and musical influences, do a detailed study of an artist or local genre, and potentially create and record their own regionally-influenced musical piece.

Philosophy
PHIL (199): Introduction to Spiritual/Religious Studies and Their Roles in Culture (6 credits)

This course engages students in meaningful work/volunteer experiences while helping them gain understanding, acquire knowledge, and develop the necessary skills for living in a globally interdependent and culturally diverse world. Students will study the spirituality of their region to understand a sense of local spiritual traditions and provide a level of insight into personal belief structures and how they structure daily life during their academic study abroad.

PHIL (399): The Self in Spiritual/Religious Practices (6 credits)

This course is an advanced course designed to engage students in meaningful work/volunteer experiences while helping them gain understanding, acquire knowledge, and develop the necessary skills for living in a globally interdependent and culturally diverse world. Students will study the spirituality of their region to understand a sense of local spiritual traditions and provide a level of insight into personal belief structures and how they structure daily life during their academic study abroad. Supplemental assignments offer opportunities for research and reflection of experiences.

Psychology
PSYCH (299): The Individual and Culture; Culture and Its Influence on the Ways People Operate (4 credits)

This course is designed to provide hands-on learning opportunities for undergraduate students who undertake foreign travel. Students will explore the psychological differences and similarities across cultural boundaries, and explore issues like “what is success across cultural lines” and “how does language determine world-view?” Students will challenge their own cultural norms and identify cultural biases in undertaking this course.

Sociology
SOC (199): Social Systems (4 credits)

This course is designed to provide hands-on learning opportunities for undergraduate students who undertake foreign travel. It offers the student an opportunity to write an ethnology based on a living within a group for three months and use either their group for a detailed study of social systems, or, through volunteering with, studying with, living with, and interviewing locals from the host-country, seek an understanding of that cultureʼs social systems.

SOC (399): The United States as Seen from the Outside (4 credits)

This course is an analysis of the views that a students host-culture has about the United States. Students will be asked to make observations about the local culture and identify some opinions that the local peoples have about America. Students will interview local people as well. Areas of inquiry that students might engage with are, “how does xxx culture view the United States? “In what ways does the local culture want to be like the US?” and “In what ways does the local culture not want to be like the US?” Students will be asked to write a summary analysis of whether they consider it wise for the local culture to engage in such pursuits and what might be some of the consequences of their opinions politically, economically, and socially.

Spanish Language
SPAN: (199) Spanish Language Immersion and Travel (6 credits)

This course is four weeks of one-on-one (or very small group) language instruction and total immersion in formal Spanish language study. It is 4-5 hours a day (approximately 80 hours for the semester) of intensive Spanish language instruction at a Carpe Diem-chosen language school in Latin America. Each student will live with home stay families for the duration of their language study. Students will supplement their language immersion by volunteering side-by-side with native-speakers, and living in the host-culture over the course of their three-month study abroad experience.

SPAN: (299) Spanish Intensive Language Immersion and Travel (6 credits)

This is an advanced study course where students will increase their Spanish fluency by intensive language instruction by living and volunteering with Spanish-speaking homestays and families. The student will also enhance language skills via travel and research to various historic sites, cultural events, exhibits, etc.

Women’s Studies
WS (101): Introduction to Global Women’s Studies (4 credits)

This course provides students with an opportunity to earn academic credit for their experiences during their academic study abroad program. Effectively it is a critical analysis of the essential issues that affect womenʼs lives. It provides for both personal and professional growth and is intended for students who desire to expand their educational experiences beyond the traditional classroom setting by using the external international experience to reflect on the inner experience, and the female experience. It engages students in meaningful conversations about the role of women in marriage, family, education, justice and reform, health care, sexuality, political and economic status and encourages them to look critically at themselves and in these areas of their own culture. Supplemental assignments offer opportunities for research and reflection of experiences.

World Languages & Literature
WLL: (199) Hindi Language Immersion and Travel (3 credits)

This course is three weeks of total immersion in language study. It is 2-3 hours a day (30 hours in total) of intensive study with a language instructor at a Carpe Diem-chosen language school. Each student will live with home stay families for the duration of their language study. Students will be expected to complete all course requirements within one month of the completion of their course date.

Please Note: This course is only offered to Latitudes Year students who complete their FVP in India.

WLL: (199) Swahili Language Immersion and Travel (3 credits)

This course is three weeks of total immersion in language study. It is 2-3 hours a day (30 hours in total) of intensive study with a language instructor at a Carpe Diem-chosen language school. Each student will live with home stay families for the duration of their language study. Students will be expected to complete all course requirements within one month of the completion of their course date.

WLL: (199) Thai Language Immersion and Travel (3 credits)

This course is three weeks of total immersion in language study. It is 2-3 hours a day (30 hours in total) of intensive study with a language instructor at a Carpe Diem-chosen language school. Each student will live with home stay families for the duration of their language study. Students will be expected to complete all course requirements within one month of the completion of their course date.

Financial Aid:


Financial aid (loans, scholarships, grants) is available for all Carpe Diem Education programs. To learn more about financial aid opportunities, please visit our Financial Aid page.

LEARN ABOUT FINANCIAL AID